Monday, August 25, 2014

Summer Update

Thankfully I have a few days of break.  The Lake Tahoe swim had to be cancelled, since preparation required swimming 15 to 20 hours a week, and I limited myself to about 10 hours.  The Greek vocabulary drill program has me at "90%", meaning that I have absorbed about 90% of the 2,000 + or - vocabulary words.  The system checks each word randomly three different ways:  Spoken Greek to English, Written Greek to English, and English to Greek.  I am a bit skeptical as to whether learning how to say "chopsticks" and "wombat" in Greek will assist me in my biblical studies.  But then there were many surprises, such as the modern Greek word for "seal" as in "seal an envelope" is basically the same as that for the seven seals in Revelation.  At this point all the words have been committed to memory, so it is just a matter of continuing the much reduced daily schedule of word practice until the program determines my error rate has reduced to near zero.

The formal Biblical Greek classes start today, which means I now have three semesters to continue the Greek program.  A challenge here is that Greek grammar is on the same order of complexity as German, so that grammar is going to be the key point requiring work.  Onward!

7 comments:

Max Coutinho said...

Hi Looney,

And God knows the German grammar is tough.
I am glad that you are progressing well in Greek - just don't forget your Hebrew :).

Supporting you all the way from Europe, I leave...

Cheers

Looney said...

There is some sporadic Hebrew review going. I have to keep coming back to it to prepare Bible lessons for church, but still wish I could just drop everything and head to Israel for a few months!

Ursula said...

I find German and its grammar dead easy. Main thing for any newcomer to remember is: Germans like to hold you in suspense. Thus the verb (the one that holds a sentence together and gives it meaning) you will find at the end. English people do find this frustrating, particularly as German sentences tend to wind a long road via one comma to the next. Patience, people, patience. Then there is inflection(variation of tone and voice). In one language it rises just before a full stop, in another it falls. I myself adore, and no one else does, sentences where you make a statement, only to attach a questionmark at the last second. It's considered highly provocative. A bit like rhetorical questions. Yes, good old rhetorical questions - so very frowned upon, yet so useful.

Other than that, Looney, and I shall not voice anything vaguely political, I am so glad that you can't "just drop everything and head to Israel for a few months".

Good luck with the revision,
U

Looney said...

U, now I am going to have flashbacks to my futile German studying days! The memories of sentences that extended for two or three paragraphs with the verb on the next page is all coming back!

Rummuser said...

You will eventually get to Sanskrit I should imagine!

Max Coutinho said...

Looeny,

I share your feelings: I too wish I could drop everything and head to Israel for a few months. But not the time yet...

Cheers

Looney said...

Rummuser, I did stumble across a vocabulary drill program that had a 5,000 word Sanskrit database.