Saturday, May 14, 2011

The Universe according to reasons.org.

This site is somewhat new to me, but I can't say that the theme is new.  It all starts with the Big Bang.  For those who are philosophically literate, the first mover of the universe was asserted to be God by Aristotle, and this notion was embraced by pagans and Christians alike for 2,000 years.  Then Edwin Hubble came along and claimed that the universe was expanding from a point, thus, the Big Bang theory was born and Aristotle was overthrown.  Or so it seemed.  Anyway, the claim is made that all scientists are compelled to believe the Big Bang theory because it is a proven fact of science.  File that last sentence away for reference.

Since this time, there have been a number of fudge factors added to make things work.  First there is "Dark Matter" which is needed to hold the galaxies together.  Something like 60% of the mass of a galaxy is supposed to consist of this unknown substance.  Then there is "Dark Energy" which is needed to insure that the Big Bang happened before the Earth supposedly was formed, rather than after.  Next there is the small detail that the Big Bang would have needed to have less mass than one black hole at its inception, so there would need to be a massive conversion of energy to mass for our current universe to have formed.  Call this Dark Physics.  Personally, I am waiting for the Dark Chocolate Fudge Factor to make the whole thing a bit more palatable.  But still we are told that the theory is mandatory based on science.

Then there is Reasons.org.  They insist that the Big Bang is a proven fact of science.  However, noting the problems (there are more than I have listed), they insist that only a miraculous act of God could make things actually work.  Duh!  Certainly it is satisfying to hear that a scientific notion is hopeless without a miraculous intervention, but they are contradicting themselves by insisting that science compels faith in the Big Bang.  On the other hand, the Big Bang's apparent overthrow of Aristotle was something too good to be true:  The scientific equivalent of a Dot Com Boom or a extraterrestrial bailout of the US Treasury.  Even if Hubble had faked all the data, an atheist intellectual would have sold his mother and first born child to prove something that could overthrow Aristotle's principle that the first cause could only be God.  That is the only reason I can imagine that the Big Bang was embraced in spite of the problems.  The more sensible thing to do is simply admit that desperate intellectuals do desperate and senseless things, and the Big Bang theory was one of them.  Back to Aristotle.

5 comments:

Delirious said...

Sounds like they are from that group of Christians who don't take anything in the Bible literally. They can't believe in miracles, so they find a way to explain them away.

Dee Ice Hole said...

I believe that when we die and return to God there will be no conflict between science and religion. Everything God does follows natural laws---everything---and we will get to understand those laws and how they work---AFTER WE DIE.

Looney said...

@Delirious, they are a bit different. They are trying to be good, God fearing Christians without at the same time being deemed worthy of contempt by the atheists. My impression - which might be wrong - is that they have more hostility towards Christians who refuse to bow to the atheists than they do for those who openly condemn God and Christianity.

Looney said...

@Dee Ice Hole, my R&D perspective is similar. I expect that when we arrive in heaven we will learn God's laws correctly and find our understanding to have been simplistic at best, and frequently completely wrong. At the same time I do believe that God intervene's periodically according to what he choose to accomplish.

Delirious said...

That is a good point Looney. My neighbor and I were talking religion yesterday, and she asked our belief about the creation. I told her that we believe that God works with natural laws. She then asked, "But then do you believe that Moses literally parted the Red Sea?" I told her we do believe that, and that although God works with natural laws, He still has power to do those things. I'm not sure I explained it very well. lol